medicine cabinets

San Luis Obispo to hold Drug Take Back Day, encourages community members to clean out medicine cabinets

SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. — San Luis Obispo will be participating in the annual Drug Take Back Day on October 24.

The event will be held from 10 am to 2 pm at the California Highway Patrol Parking lot at 675 California Boulevard in San Luis Obispo.

The event will be free with a no contact drive-thru that will follow COVID-19 Public Health safety measures to ensure everyone’s safety.

CHP will be working with the SLO County Opioid Safety Coalition to facilitate the safe disposal of medication while also offering privacy to residents dropping off their prescription drugs.

Since 2016, the organization has collected close to 2,000 pounds of prescription drugs.

According to data from the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program, drug overdoses have spiked up to about 18 percent due to the pandemic.

The organization says people across the nation have been faced with isolation, anxiety, uncertainty, financial worries

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How Genexa Is Leading The Clean Medicine Revolution And Getting Us To ‘Ditch The Dirty’

As a parent, I’m always thinking of my six year old son and how to keep him healthy and safe. I was surprised to hear of the idea of ‘clean medicine’ – and learn more about how common medications oftentimes contain ingredients which could be harmful.

Genexa is a ‘clean medicine’ company that is on a mission to get us to ‘Ditch the Dirty’. I caught up with co-founders David Johnson and Max Spielberg to find out more.

Afdhel Aziz: Max, David, welcome. Please tell us how the two of you came to start Genexa?

David Johnson: I grew up in a “nuts and seeds” type of household. My parents, both chiropractors, were particularly cognizant of everything health related. They always tried to choose natural and organic foods.  In having my own kids now, I want to raise them similarly, using the cleanest ingredients

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Health Beat: Stocking your medicine cabinet during COVID | Health Beat

ORLANDO, Fla. – Your medicine cabinet might be full, but is it full of the right stuff? Experts said there are some medications and devices that you should have, especially during the coronavirus pandemic.

The first: a thermometer. It’s the tried-and-true way to check for a fever, which is a common symptom of COVID-19. Make sure you have extra batteries for it. Have ibuprofen or acetaminophen on hand to help reduce a fever and relieve pain. Also, you may want to purchase a pulse oximeter, which measures oxygen levels in your blood.

“Monitoring oxygen is important in the high-risk populations and in anybody who we know has COVID,” said Dr. Richard Levitan, an emergency physician.

It may detect early signs of pneumonia, which is particularly important in COVID cases.

“If we can detect the pneumonia earlier, then many, many more patients can avoid ventilators,” Levitan continued.

COVID-19 can also give

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How Two Dads Are Disrupting Medicine

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

When longtime friends David Johnson and Max Spielberg were talking about what Spielberg was taking for his allergies, and the medicine they were giving their children to fight fevers and the common cold, the two dads decided to take a closer look at what was actually in those over-the counter (OTC) products. 

“I’m your nuts and seeds type of guy who never really took many medications growing up,” Johnson says. “When we turn to the over-the-counter shelf, we should be taking a product that makes us feel better, and helps us get better, but doesn’t have the excess ingredients that are unnecessary.”

With Johnson’s finance background and Spielberg’s legal background, the two set out to clean up every medicine aisle. They spent two years in research and development with a team of doctors and scientists before launching their medicine business Genexa.

“What

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Need an excuse to clean out your medicine cabinet? Here it is

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Police departments have been participating in the national Drug Take Back event since 2010 to collect extra and unused prescription medications. (WYDaily file/Courtesy Williamsburg Police Department)

If you’re looking to clean out your medicine cabinet, then October is the perfect time to do it.

The York-Poquoson Sheriff’s Office, James City County Police and the Williamsburg Police Department are each hosting Drug Take Back events on Oct. 24 from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

The event is a Drug Enforcement Administration regulated event.

“Too often, unused prescription drugs find their way into the wrong hands. That’s dangerous and often tragic,” Shelley Ward, spokeswoman for YPSO, wrote in an email.

“That’s why it’s great to see hundreds of folks from across our area safely and anonymously clean out their medicine cabinets,” Ward added.

In a non-COVID year, local law enforcement agencies typically hold events like this twice a year. But Williamsburg Police Officer

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Don’t Store Medication in Your Bathroom Medicine Cabinet

A medicine cabinet is a great place to keep grooming tools or toiletries, but despite the name, it’s a terrible place to store medications. The temperature and humidity of a bathroom can make medications go bad more quickly than they otherwise would.



Open pill bottles viewed from overhead


© Photo: Steve Cukrov (Shutterstock)
Open pill bottles viewed from overhead

Yes, medications can expire—an expiration date will be listed somewhere on the box or bottle. But many drugs, especially those in pill form, can last for a long time (even longer than their expiration dates, in many cases)—though only if they’re stored in good conditions: cool, dry, dark places. Bathroom medicine cabinets fail two out of three: they tend to be hotspots for high temperatures and humidity.

Is It Safe to Take Expired Drugs?

Gallery: 5 Mistakes You Make Choosing a Hand Sanitizer (Best Life)

A dresser drawer or a kitchen cabinet (away from the stove, of

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Stocking your medicine cabinet during COVID-19

The COVID shutdown left many Americans scrambling to get their much-needed medications, medical devices, and equipment. So, what should you stock up on during this crisis?

Your medicine cabinet might be full, but is it full of the right stuff? Experts say there are some meds and devices that you should have … especially during the coronavirus pandemic. The first: a thermometer. It’s the tried-and-true way to check for a fever, which is a common symptom of Covid-19. Make sure you have extra batteries for it. Have ibuprofen or acetaminophen on hand to help reduce a fever and relieve pain. Also, you may want to purchase a pulse oximeter which measures oxygen levels in your blood.

“Monitoring oxygen is important in the high-risk populations and in anybody who we know has COVID,” shares Richard Levitan, MD, an emergency physician.

It may detect early signs of pneumonia, which is particularly important

Read More

Stocking your medicine cabinet during COVID | WJMN

The COVID shutdown left many Americans scrambling to get their much-needed medications, medical devices, and equipment. So, what should you stock up on during this crisis?

Your medicine cabinet might be full, but is it full of the right stuff? Experts say there are some meds and devices that you should have … especially during the coronavirus pandemic. The first: a thermometer. It’s the tried-and-true way to check for a fever, which is a common symptom of Covid-19. Make sure you have extra batteries for it. Have ibuprofen or acetaminophen on hand to help reduce a fever and relieve pain. Also, you may want to purchase a pulse oximeter which measures oxygen levels in your blood.

“Monitoring oxygen is important in the high-risk populations and in anybody who we know has COVID,” shares Richard Levitan, MD, an emergency physician.

It may detect early signs of pneumonia, which is particularly important

Read More

Health Report: Stocking your medicine cabinet during COVID-19

Posted: Updated:

The COVID-19 shutdown has left many Americans scrambling to get their much needed medications, medical devices and equipment.

So what should you stock up on during this crisis?

It’s Your Health tonight.

Your medicine cabinet might be full, but is it full of the right stuff?

Experts say that there are some meds and devices that you should have especially during the coronavirus pandemic.

The first is a thermometer, it’s the tried and true way to check for a fever which is a common symptom of COVID-19.

Make sure to have extra batteries for the thermometer and to also have ibuprofen or ACET aminophen on hand to help reduce a fever and relieve pain.

You might also want to purchase a pulse oximeter which measures oxygen levels in your blood.

“Monitoring oxygen is

Read More

A call for greater transparency about inactive ingredients

pills
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

There are many more ingredients in every pill you take than what is listed on the bottle label. These other ingredients, which are combined with the therapeutic one, are often sourced from around the world before landing in your medicine cabinet and are not always benign.

Earlier this year, the U.S. Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, which requires manufacturers to report real or potential drug shortages to the FDA. Manufacturers are now required to report disruptions in the manufacturing of an active pharmaceutical ingredient—the part of the medicine that produces the intended therapeutic benefit.

But the CARES Act doesn’t include excipients—the “inactive” ingredients that make up the bulk of a final medicine. It also doesn’t include the materials needed to package and distribute medical products, such as vials and other containers, packaging, and labels. While the CARES Act improves the flow

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