health care

Coronavirus lawsuit standards for businesses, health care workers approved in Michigan Senate

LANSING, MI – A slew of guidelines for lawsuits addressing various COVID-19 exposure scenarios was approved during Tuesday and early Wednesday sessions in the Michigan Senate.

A bill guaranteeing immunity for health care workers providing COVID-19 care from civil action was passed 29-8 in the evening hours of the Oct. 13 Senate session. House Bill 6159, sponsored by Rep. Roger Hauck, R-Union Twp., does not hold workers liable for injuries to patients under their care, except in instances of gross negligence.

The bill was sent back to the state House with minor changes in wording before it was approved, 64-37. It will now head to Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s desk for potential signature.

The other bill package on the legislature’s docket protects businesses from liability for people who contracted the disease on their premises, except in negligent circumstances. It also protects employees fired for following public health guidelines against the wishes

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Twentyeight Health is a telemedicine company expanding access to women’s health and reproductive care

New York’s Twentyeight Health is taking the wildly telemedicine services for women’s health popularized by companies like Nurx and bringing them to a patient population that previously hadn’t had access. 

The mission to provide women who are Medicaid or underinsured should not be deprived of the same kinds of care that patients who have more income security or better healthcare coverage enjoy, according to the company’s founder, Amy Fan.

The mission, and the company’s technology, have managed to convince a slew of investors who have poured $5.1 million in seed funding into the new startup. Third Prime led the round, which included investments from Town Hall Ventures, SteelSky Ventures, Aglaé Ventures, GingerBread Capital, Rucker Park Capital, Predictive VC, and angel investors like Stu Libby, Zoe Barry, and Wan Li Zhu.

“Women who are on Medicaid, who are underinsured or without health insurance often struggle to find access to reproductive health

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Med students on how COVID pushed them into action, highlighted health care inequities

It was on a Saturday in mid-March when Abby Schiff, then a third-year medical student at Harvard working through surgery clinical rotations, found out she wouldn’t be going back to the hospital.



a group of people on a sidewalk: Medical student Francis Wright (top left) during a mask drive early on in the pandemic with his classmates (clockwise) India Perez-Urbano, Kara Lau, Lane Epps, Ninad Bhat, Laeesha Cornejo and Hunter Jackson, the last of whom came up with the idea.


© Courtesy Francis Wright
Medical student Francis Wright (top left) during a mask drive early on in the pandemic with his classmates (clockwise) India Perez-Urbano, Kara Lau, Lane Epps, Ninad Bhat, Laeesha Cornejo and Hunter Jackson, the last of whom came up with the idea.

She had worked the day before, but with the coronavirus threat growing quickly, Schiff, like thousands of other medical students across the country, was sidelined when the Association of American Medical Colleges issued a temporary suspension of clinical rotations in hopes of protecting students and patients, and conserving personal protective equipment (PPE).

She didn’t sit around waiting, though. As nurses came out of retirement and medical school professors pressed pause on teaching

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UnitedHealth Group boosts outlook as more seek health care



a sign on the side of a road: A portion of the UnitedHealth Group Inc.'s campus in Minnetonka is shown in 2012 file photo.


© Star Tribune/Star Tribune/Jim Mone/Star Tribune/TNS
A portion of the UnitedHealth Group Inc.’s campus in Minnetonka is shown in 2012 file photo.

Third-quarter profit beat expectations at UnitedHealth Group as the nation’s largest insurer saw demand for health care return closer to normal levels after the COVID-19 pandemic drove widespread delays in the spring.

In an earnings release Wednesday morning, the Minnetonka-based health care giant boosted its earnings outlook for the year and talked up growth prospects for its large business selling Medicare Advantage health plans to seniors.

But enrollment in commercial coverage purchased by employers slipped by about 420,000 people, or 2%, between the ends of June and September. The company’s UnitedHealthcare division for health insurance has offered premium rebates, cost-sharing waivers and grace periods on payments to keep employers and other customers in the market for coverage despite the pandemic’s economic downturn.

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“The health system continued

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Power Up: Barrett’s legal views on abortion, the election and health care are now marginally clearer

  • This about sums it up: “The safest and surest route to the prize,” Elena Kagan wrote in a law review article in 1995 of Supreme Court confirmation hearings, according to the New York Times’s Adam Liptak, “lay in alternating platitudinous statement and judicious silence.”

Invoking the Ginsburg rule, Barrett stated she would provide “no hints, no forecasts, no previews,” as the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said during her 1993 confirmation hearing. 

  • “Justice Ginsburg’s favored technique took the form of a pincer movement,” Kagan wrote in her 1995 article about Ginsburg’s performance, according to Liptak. “If a question was too specific, she would decline to answer on the ground that she did not want to forecast a vote. If it was too general, she would say a judge should not deal in abstractions or hypothetical questions.”

Like many Republicans, Barrett even employed the commonly used, “I can’t really speak

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Sen. Mark Warner, opponent Daniel Gade ramp up attacks over healthcare, Affordable Care Act

Gade compared Warner to a windup doll with only one line as he fended off the jabs, saying he did not support the “nonsense idea” of repealing the health-care legislation known as Obamacare.

“Every time you pull the Mark Warner string, he says I’m for repealing the ACA,” Gade said. “And I’ve never said that. I’m not for it. We need to upgrade the ACA.”

The issue of health-care access has dominated much of the campaign. It is personal for both Warner, who has a daughter with type 1 diabetes, and Gade, who lost his leg in combat in Iraq in 2005.

Gade pledged Tuesday night never to support a bill that does not protect people with preexisting conditions. Warner stressed that prescription drug pricing reform is essential and said the government should have the power to negotiate prices with pharmaceutical companies.

Gade, a first-time political candidate, held his own

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Calgary doctors fight back against concerns over privatizing health care in Alberta



a man holding a sign: Dr. Luanne Metz, founder of Eyes Forward campaign.


© Carolyn Kury de Castillo/Global News
Dr. Luanne Metz, founder of Eyes Forward campaign.

A Calgary doctor has started a campaign aimed at fighting possible privatization of health care in Alberta.

Dr. Luanne Metz is organizing volunteers to hit and streets of the Varsity neighbourhood to get a message across: a private health-care system in Alberta would end up hurting those who can least afford it.

“It drives up waitlist times because there is a finite number of people. So some of the providers move into the private system and you have fewer people to serve the public. It isn’t a happy situation,” said Metz.

Read more: Alberta health-care advocates warn more private surgeries could drive up costs

The Calgary neurologist has started a campaign backed by dozens of Alberta physicians.

They are worried about a proposal on the upcoming UCP AGM agenda from the Calgary-Varsity constituency that asks for

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Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn’t classify Roe v Wade as ‘superprecedent’

Welcome to Tuesday’s Overnight Health Care.



a woman smiling for the camera: Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she's 'not hostile' toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn't classify Roe v Wade as 'superprecedent' | Eli Lilly pauses study of COVID-19 treatment over safety concerns


© Greg Nash
Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn’t classify Roe v Wade as ‘superprecedent’ | Eli Lilly pauses study of COVID-19 treatment over safety concerns

Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett faced questions in her Senate confirmation hearing about her views on the Affordable Care Act and Roe v. Wade but did not give much away. Mitch McConnell is going to force a vote on “targeted” COVID-19 relief next week, and Trump has decided to pick a fight with Anthony Fauci.

We’ll start with Barrett:

Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act

Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Tuesday that she is “not hostile” toward the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as Senate Democrats pressed her during a confirmation hearing about the implications for the health care law if

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Feinstein grills Barrett on Roe v. Wade at confirmation hearing



a group of people standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 12: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett makes her opening statement on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. With less than a month until the presidential election, President Donald Trump tapped Amy Coney Barrett to be his third Supreme Court nominee in just four years. If confirmed, Barrett would replace the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Photo by Alex Edelman-Pool/Getty Images)


© Alex Edelman/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 12: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett makes her opening statement on the first day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 12, 2020 in Washington, DC. With less than a month until the presidential election, President Donald Trump tapped Amy Coney Barrett to be his third Supreme Court nominee in just four years. If confirmed, Barrett would replace the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Photo by Alex Edelman-Pool/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett declined to wade into the Supreme Court’s marquee rulings on abortion during her confirmation hearing Tuesday, resisting Democrats’ efforts to nail down her view on the precedents.

In response to questions from Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the Senate Judiciary Committee’s top Democrat, on whether she agreed with the late Justice

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Barrett Avoids Slips as Democrats Press on Abortion, Health Care

(Bloomberg) — Democrats grilled U.S. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett for hours about abortion rights, health-care law, guns and election disputes but made little progress derailing her likely Senate confirmation and a strengthened conservative majority on the court.



a man and a woman standing in front of a microphone: Amy Coney Barrett swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.


© Bloomberg
Amy Coney Barrett swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.

Barrett refused to say on Tuesday whether she would disqualify herself from any disputes over the impending presidential election and offered no hints on how she would vote if the court reconsiders the landmark abortion case Roe v. Wade. In the second day of her Senate Judiciary Committee hearings, she also parried questions on gun rights, the general fate of longstanding Supreme Court precedents and the Affordable Care Act.

Barrett told senators she made no promises to President Donald Trump about how she would vote on an ACA case the

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