failing

The pandemic is a once-in-a-generation test for Philly moms. Most say they’re failing

Cassie Gafford never thought of herself as a stay-at-home mom. She spent years training to become a dentist, then working and teaching in the field.



a person sitting on a bench in front of a building: Cassandra Gafford in the backyard of her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She worried going back to work as a dentist in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger.


© JESSICA GRIFFIN/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Cassandra Gafford in the backyard of her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She worried going back to work as a dentist in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger.

Then, this summer, she quit.

Gafford, 32, of Logan Square, worried going back to work in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger — and putting her 22-month-old daughter in day care didn’t seem safe either, since she’d already survived a frightening case of pneumonia in January.



a person standing on a sidewalk: Tamika Diggs outside her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She works nights as a concierge at a luxury apartment building. She finishes her shift at 3 a.m., then Ubers home to West Philadelphia, where she helps her sons with their work hours later.


© JESSICA GRIFFIN/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Tamika Diggs outside her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She works nights as a concierge at a luxury apartment building. She finishes her shift at 3 a.m., then Ubers home to West Philadelphia,

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Science and health experts, not common-sense citizens, have been failing America

Without common sense in government, civilization cannot continue.

After the summer protests and rioting in many large cities, activists demanded a defunding, or at least radical pullbacks, of the police. So-called crime experts often concurred. So some city governments ignored public warnings and diminished their police presence despite a sharp rise in crime in many cities. Looting and arson were often ignored.

If you call 911 in a large American city, there is no guarantee that anyone will answer promptly and send out police to aid the endangered. So gun sales have soared. Some people who never before owned weapons, or even opposed the use of firearms, are now terrified to remain unarmed. Self-protection often outweighs abstract ideology.

According to a recent Gallup poll, most Black Americans favor maintaining or increasing police presence. Often, city officials who support cutting back on law enforcement still expect their own homes and

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Trump looks for ways to win over voters on health care after failing to deliver on promises

He is expected to mostly avoid speaking about repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, something he has long promised to do but a position that is ­unpopular with voters.

Advisers also expect Trump to sign an executive order promising to protect people with preexisting conditions as part of Thursday’s event, though the administration has not detailed how this objective could be achieved without the safeguards in President Barack Obama’s signature 2010 health-care law, according to another senior administration official. Experts have said such an executive order would amount to little more than a public relations ploy, and the order is not viewed as a substantive policy proposal among many West Wing advisers.

Despite making lowering drug prices and repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act key planks of his 2016 election bid, Trump has struggled to deliver on many of his health-care promises in his first term. He trails

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