election

New Data Shows Health Care Policy and Costs Top of Mind for Consumers Leading Up to 2020 Presidential Election

Sapphire Digital Survey Reveals Consumers’ View of Health Care Price Transparency and How Health Care Policy Will Influence Their Vote

Sapphire Digital, a leader in empowering consumers to make better choices that deliver health care savings, today announced survey results assessing consumer views on the health care system and health care policy leading up to the 2020 presidential election. The findings reveal health care policy will influence 79% of U.S. adults’ votes in the election, with 50% of those consumers reporting health policy will most influence or heavily influence their votes compared to other policy issues. Additionally, more than one-third (34%) of adults surveyed report they would like to see both presidential candidates prioritize lowering care costs leading up to the election.

For years, health care costs have been on the rise and the recent financial impact of COVID-19 has made cost concerns even more prominent. With consumers looking to

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Power Up: Barrett’s legal views on abortion, the election and health care are now marginally clearer

  • This about sums it up: “The safest and surest route to the prize,” Elena Kagan wrote in a law review article in 1995 of Supreme Court confirmation hearings, according to the New York Times’s Adam Liptak, “lay in alternating platitudinous statement and judicious silence.”

Invoking the Ginsburg rule, Barrett stated she would provide “no hints, no forecasts, no previews,” as the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said during her 1993 confirmation hearing. 

  • “Justice Ginsburg’s favored technique took the form of a pincer movement,” Kagan wrote in her 1995 article about Ginsburg’s performance, according to Liptak. “If a question was too specific, she would decline to answer on the ground that she did not want to forecast a vote. If it was too general, she would say a judge should not deal in abstractions or hypothetical questions.”

Like many Republicans, Barrett even employed the commonly used, “I can’t really speak

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Democrats say Barrett is a threat to health care, election rulings

Washington

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators’ questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent, and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to lock in a conservative court majority for years to come.

The mood is likely to shift to a more confrontational tone as Judge Barrett, an appellate court judge with very little trial court experience, is grilled in 30-minute segments Tuesday by Democrats gravely opposed to President Donald Trump’s nominee, yet virtually powerless to stop her rise. Republicans are rushing her to confirmation before Election Day.

“This should not be President Trump’s judge,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Democrats say the winner of the presidential election should choose the nominee.

“This should be your judge,” she said.

Judge Barrett presented her approach to the law as conservative and fair on

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How to trade health care stocks into the 2020 U.S. presidential election

With less than a month until the election and Democratic challenger Joe Biden opening up a wide lead, the politically sensitive health-care sector is on watch.

Trading Nation: How investors should trade the health care space as the election nears

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Boris Schlossberg, managing director of FX strategy at BK Asset Management, said a blue wave where Democrats take the White House and Senate while holding the House is not a foregone conclusion. However, should it happen, he sees benefits for the health-care sector.

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“If you were to sort of forecast that, yes, you get a big blue wave, Biden wins and you get a big a Democratic sweep, then I think it’s actually not bad for the health-care sector, because the ultimate end goal here is that there will be more people having health care, and there will actually be a bigger buyer

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Take care of your mental health this election season

Content

Regardless of political party, elections weigh on many Americans, and with long-lasting coverage, it can be difficult to escape the political noise. A Baylor College of Medicine expert offers advice to those experiencing distress throughout election season.

“There is uncertainty with change,” said Dr. Eric Storch, professor and vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and vice chair of psychology in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor. “People worry about how their lives will change depending on the election results or that the elected individual may not represent them or their values – this can heighten feelings of distress throughout the election.”

Keeping up with your mental health is crucial if you feel triggered by political events. If you’re experiencing heightened levels of stress due to the election, try to address those feelings by being an active participant in the political process:

  • Make your voice
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Barrett refuses to commit to recusal in election cases

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett batted back Democrats’ skeptical questions on abortion, gun rights and election disputes in lively Senate confirmation testimony Tuesday, insisting she would bring no personal agenda to the court but would decide cases as they come.

The 48-year-old appellate court judge declared her conservative views with often colloquial language, but refused many specifics. She declined to say whether she would recuse herself from any election-related cases involving President Donald Trump, who nominated her to fill the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and is pressing to have her confirmed before the the Nov. 3 election.

“Judges can’t just wake up one day and say I have an agenda — I like guns, I hate guns, I like abortion, I hate abortion — and walk in like a royal queen and impose their will on the world,” Barrett told the Senate

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More Than Half of Americans Say Their Mental Health is Suffering Because of the Presidential Election, Survey Finds

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 13, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Political tensions in the U.S. are taking a toll on the wellbeing of Americans, especially younger adults, with 52 percent of the adult population reporting that their mental health has suffered due to the 2020 presidential election, according to results from a national CARAVAN® survey conducted on behalf of The Maple Counseling Center, a nonprofit mental health organization.

Stress and anxiety are the top factors among adults who say their mental health has suffered, with 31 percent of survey respondents experiencing more of these symptoms due to the election, followed by those who are feeling more worried (29 percent), and those who are undergoing more hopelessness (16 percent). Feeling angrier at other people’s political opinions, and not being able to sleep at night, rounded out the list of how Americans’ mental health has been impacted as a result of the upcoming election.

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Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s hearings Tuesday to include health care, election questions

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators’ questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to lock in a conservative court majority for years to come.

The mood is likely to shift to a more confrontational tone as Barrett, an appellate court judge with very little trial court experience, is grilled in 30-minute segments Tuesday by Democrats gravely opposed to President Donald Trump’s nominee, yet virtually powerless to stop her rise. Republicans are rushing her to confirmation before Election Day.

C-SPAN will air the confirmation hearing live starting at 9 a.m. Cable news networks will also cover it throughout the day.

Amy Coney Barrett

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett arrives for her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Caroline Brehman/Pool via AP)AP

Barrett

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With eye on election, Democrats hammer health care on first day of Barrett hearing

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats came to the first day of the Supreme Court hearings Monday with a singular message: Health care coverage and protections for millions of Americans are at risk if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed.

Like a choir singing in unison, Democrats carried the same tune, in different vocal ranges. Each showed photos of constituents who have battled illness and stand to lose potential lifesaving treatment if the Affordable Care Act were axed, demonstrating an unusual level of harmony for a party not known for message discipline.

The relentless attacks were aimed at exploiting the GOP’s Achilles’ heel in the election — a pandemic-weary public that continues to cite health care as a top issue and trusts Democrats more on the topic. Without the votes to stop Republicans from confirming Barrett, 48, to a lifetime appointment on the court, Democrats are seeking to maximize their revenge at the

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Schumer: Trump’s Supreme Court nominee should recuse from health care, election cases

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBiden says he’ll reveal position on court packing ‘when the election is over’ Pelosi asked if steroids influenced Trump’s decision on coronavirus relief Schumer and Statehood for Puerto Rico MORE (D-N.Y.) said on Sunday that Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President TrumpDonald John TrumpNorth Korea unveils large intercontinental ballistic missile at military parade Trump no longer considered a risk to transmit COVID-19, doctor says New ad from Trump campaign features Fauci MORE‘s Supreme Court nominee, should pledge to recuse herself from any cases involving the Affordable Care Act or the outcome of the Nov. 3 election. 

“This nominee comes before us with serious conflicts of interest and we’re here today to say that given Judge Barrett’s conflicts of interest she should recuse herself from any decision involving the Affordable Care Act and its protections and any decision related to the election that we

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