Effect

The Bryson DeChambeau Effect: Ready or not, the game is about to change | Golf World

I played with him at Colonial the first week back out, but I sort of said, ‘OK, wait until he gets to a proper golf course, he’ll have to rein it back in.’ This is as proper as they come, and look what’s happened.”
—Rory McIlroy, on Bryson DeChambeau

“So many times I relied on science, and it worked every single time.”
—DeChambeau, following his U.S. Open victory

For a moment, let’s forget the specifics. Let’s forget the weight and distance gain, the muscle activation fitness regimen, the protein shakes, the single iron length, the putting lasers, and a thousand other things that fall under the umbrella of “science.” Forget it all and think broadly. We need some distance to understand Bryson DeChambeau’s win at the U.S. Open—the most consequential result for golf since Tiger Woods won the Masters in 1997—and to internalize the only conclusion that really matters: On

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The Pandemic’s Outsized Effect on Women’s Mental Health

COVID-19 is a devilishly versatile disease, attacking all manner of body systems and doing all manner of damage—to the lungs, the heart, the liver, the kidneys. Though it doesn’t attack the mind directly, the pandemic the virus has caused has been devastating to mental health, and in many cases, the most vulnerable group is women.

In a new study conducted by CARE, a non-profit international aid organization, investigators have found that while almost nobody is spared from the anxiety, worry and overall emotional fatigue of the coronavirus pandemic, women are almost three times as likely as men to report suffering from significant mental health consequences (27% compared to 10%), including anxiety, loss of appetite, inability to sleep and trouble completing everyday tasks.

The study was ambitious, involving surveys of 10,400 women and men in 38 countries including the U.S., as well as others in Latin America, Asia and the Middle

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Alcohol’s Effect on Your Teeth and Gums

Alcohol, though enjoyable in a drunkard or even a connoisseur’s intoxicated state, is known to not only waste internal organs – but teeth as well. Alcohol is a napalm bomb of sugars, which, when metabolized by the saliva in the mouth, almost turns immediately into plaque. And situation gets worse because almost every drunkard forgets to brush his/her teeth after drinking a bottle full of spirits.

Gin, rummy, wine, vodka, whiskey, brandy and all sorts of alcoholic concoctions (and not to mention beer) have high concentrations of sugar. Sweet wines that have found their way into the mainstream liquor market are also taking center stage in being the primary cause of plaque and tooth decay on binging adolescents and adults. Sugar is the sole catalyst in defining sweet wine from dry wine.

Grapes and apples are two of the primary ingredients used in wine. Both of these fruits, when fermented, … Read More