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A ‘second wave’ of mental health devastation due to COVID-19 is imminent, experts say

While the world struggles to manage the initial waves of death and disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, there is mounting evidence accumulating that “a second wave” linked to rising rates of mental health and substance use disorders could be building, according to an article published Monday in the medical journal JAMA.”A second wave of devastation is imminent, attributable to mental health consequences of COVID-19,” wrote authors Dr. Naomi Simon, Dr. Glenn Saxe and Dr. Charles Marmar, all from New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine.”The magnitude of this second wave is likely to overwhelm the already frayed mental health system, leading to access problems, particularly for the most vulnerable persons.” This second mental health wave, the researchers suggested, will bring further challenges, such as increased deaths from suicide and drug overdoses, and will have a disproportionate effect on the same groups that the first wave did: Black and Hispanic … Read More

Quincy food store closed due to COVID-19 cases; health officials want to know if you were there between Oct. 2 and Oct. 11

A second employee at the Fruit Basket Marketplace in Quincy has tested positive for COVID-19 and the city continues to ask anyone who was in the popular store between Oct. 2 and Oct. 11 to contact them, especially if they are experiencing any symptoms.

The city first alerted the public on Monday to a single identified case of COVID at the Granite Street store on the city’s official Facebook account. City Health Commissioner Ruth Jones said in a telephone interview Tuesday that a second of the store’s four employees has now tested positive. Both employees worked between Oct. 2 and Oct. 11.

Jones said customers who were in the store for brief periods of time – less than 15 minutes – are likely not to have health concerns related to exposure to the employees. (If they feel symptomatic they should be tested, she stressed.)

Of greater concern, Jones said, are

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Health professionals see rise in mammograms after drop due to pandemic | News

Valley hospitals are seeing an increase in mammograms this fall as women return to clinics for vital screenings many delayed during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Officials at both Evangelical Community Hospital and Geisinger said the number of mammograms dropped significantly in the spring, a trend that was seen nationally. In an interview earlier this month, Dr. Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, said some clinics in the U.S. have seen a 95% decline in mammography.

“For a disease like breast cancer, that’s really important,” Sharpless said. “Stage is the major determinant of outcome in breast cancer.”

“If you have regular screenings with mammograms, you can catch it very early,” said Geisinger’s Dr. Monica Froicu. “You can go to a biopsy, have surgery without chemotherapy. If a woman is discovered in Stage 1 or Stage 2, there is a 99 percent survival. If we can detect it when it’s so

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A ‘second wave’ of mental health devastation due to Covid-19 is imminent, experts say | Live Well

“This magnitude of death over a short period of time is an international tragedy on a historic scale,” the authors said. “This interpersonal loss is compounded by societal disruption.”

Of central concern, the authors wrote, is “the transformation of normal grief and distress into prolonged grief and major depressive disorder and symptoms of posttraumatic health disorder.”

A grief that lasts longer

Prolonged grief, which affects approximately 10% of bereaved people, is characterized by at least six months of intense longing, preoccupation or both, with the deceased; emotional pain; loneliness; difficulty reengaging in life; avoidance; feeling life is meaningless; and increased suicide risk. These conditions can also become chronic with additional comorbidities, such as substance use disorders, the authors said.

The 10% affected by prolonged grief is likely an underestimate for grief related to deaths from Covid-19, and each death leaves approximately nine family members bereaved, the authors said. This means

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Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn’t visited White House in two months due to coronavirus

Welcome to Thursday’s Overnight Health Care.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn't visited White House in two months due to coronavirus | Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rise 4 percent


© Getty Images
Overnight Health Care: Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received | McConnell says he hasn’t visited White House in two months due to coronavirus | Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rise 4 percent

Regeneron filed for emergency authorization of its antibody COVID-19 treatment drug, just hours after President Trump claimed it basically cured him. Mitch McConnell hasn’t been to the White House in months, and a new analysis shows Americans’ job-based health care is continually getting more expensive.

We’ll start with Regeneron:

Regeneron asks for emergency authorization of coronavirus treatment Trump received

Biotech company Regeneron late Wednesday applied for emergency authorization for an experimental antibody treatment praised by President Trump.

“Subsequent to our discussions with regulatory authorities, we have submitted a request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for our

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Trump’s doctors can only share information he authorizes due to HIPAA

  • President Trump’s doctor has declined to answer several major questions about the president’s COVID-19 case.
  • His physicians are bound by HIPAA privacy laws, which only allow them to disclose the details about a patient’s health that the patient has authorized them to share.
  • No law requires presidents to share all their health information with the public. 
  • “The ethics are stacked up against the public understanding, knowing, and really following what’s happening,” one expert said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The public will likely never know all the details surrounding President Donald Trump’s battle with COVID-19.

His doctor, Sean Conley, declined to share key details about Trump’s health during a press conference on Monday, citing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).

“I’m not at liberty to discuss,” Conley said when asked about Trump’s lung scans, adding, “there are HIPAA rules and regulations that restrict me

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Debate should never have happened due to Trump’s “mental health”

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

U.S. President Donald Trump participates in the first presidential debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at the Health Education Campus of Case Western Reserve University on September 29, 2020 in Cleveland, Ohio. Win McNamee/Getty Images

A Yale psychiatrist who has repeatedly raised questions about President Trump’s mental health argued that Tuesday’s debate against Joe Biden should never have been allowed to go forward.

Dr. Bandy X. Lee, a forensic psychiatrist at Yale School of Medicine and the president of the World Mental Health Coalition, said in an interview with Salon that Trump lacked the basic “mental health” to participate in a presidential debate.

Trump derailed the debate throughout the entire 90 minutes, repeatedly refusing to comply with the rules his campaign had agreed to and incessantly heckling his opponent. The event was universally panned as a “sh*tshow” and “a hot mess inside a dumpster fire inside a

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Universal Health Services offline due to ‘IT security issue’

By Raphael Satter

Sept 28 (Reuters)Universal Health Services Inc UHS.N, one of the largest for-profit hospital operators in the United States, said on Monday its network has been knocked offline following an unspecified “IT security issue.”

UHS, which runs some 400 hospitals and care centers, mainly in the United States but also in the United Kingdom, did not specify the nature of the issue, saying in a brief statement it was using “established back-up processes” to recover.

Text messages reviewed by Reuters showed UHS instructing employees to avoid exposing their devices to the company’s corporate network, something one expert said was a sign of a ransomware outbreak.

“I can’t think of any other reason,” said Gabrielle Hempel, a researcher who studies the security of medical devices and says she has been in touch with people dealing with the incident.

Ransomware, which works by locking victims out

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Shasta County nursing home COVID-19 outbreak mainly due to healthcare workers

A coronavirus outbreak at a skilled nursing facility is primarily coming from its own healthcare workers, Shasta County Health Officer Dr. Karen Ramstrom said Wednesday. 



a blue bag on a table: A health worker displays the packaged nasopharyngeal swab, which goes about two inches into the nasal cavity, used on patients at a drive-thru COVID-19 testing station for University of Washington Medicine patients on March 17, 2020, in Seattle. The appointment-only drive-thru clinic began a day earlier. Health authorities in Washington reported more COVID-19 deaths in the state that has been hardest hit by the outbreak.


© Elaine Thompson/AP
A health worker displays the packaged nasopharyngeal swab, which goes about two inches into the nasal cavity, used on patients at a drive-thru COVID-19 testing station for University of Washington Medicine patients on March 17, 2020, in Seattle. The appointment-only drive-thru clinic began a day earlier. Health authorities in Washington reported more COVID-19 deaths in the state that has been hardest hit by the outbreak.

County officials didn’t name the facility directly but directed reporters to a California Department of Public Health database, which shows Windsor Redding Care Center has reported 36 infections among its residents.

The previous day, Ramstrom told the Shasta County Board of Supervisors that 34 residents and eight employees have tested positive at a local facility since since

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UN Slashes Health Care In Yemen Due To Lack Of Funding

The United Nations said Wednesday that critical aid had been cut at 300 health centres across war-ravaged Yemen due to a lack of funding, with lifesaving food handouts also reduced.

Between April and August, more than a third of the UN’s major humanitarian programmes in Yemen had been reduced or shut down entirely, the UN said, warning of further drastic cuts “in coming weeks unless additional funding is received”.

Lise Grande, the UN’s humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, said only $1 billion of the $3.2 billion needed had been received.

“It’s an impossible situation,” Grande said.

“This is the worst humanitarian crisis in the world, yet we don’t have the resources we need to save the people who are suffering and will die if we don’t help.”

Yemen has been in left in ruins by six years of war and tens of thousands of people — mainly civilians — have been

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