downplayed

Under America’s Broken Health Care System, Some Who Downplayed COVID-19 Received the Best Treatment For It

Jodi Click, who suffers from severe Crohn’s Disease, has long been accustomed to frequent doctors visits and medical procedures. But nothing prepares the 40-year-old for her lengthy battle with COVID-19 this year. After contracting the virus in March, she has spent months enduring the aftermath of the disease: unpredictable blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and low oxygenation levels. She now relies on a walker for mobility.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.


© Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images
President Donald Trump removes his mask upon return to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 05, 2020 in Washington, DC. Trump spent three days hospitalized for coronavirus.

Her wallet hasn’t recovered either. Because of her prolonged illness, she quit her teaching job, which meant she lost her employer health insurance and was forced to switch to a government insurance plan amidst a wave of health problems. She’s now struggling to afford basic

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While receiving the best health care, Trump downplayed the risk of COVID-19

With 210,000 Americans dead and nearly 7.5 million others infected by the virus — many of whom could hardly imagine the level of care the president has received — Trump’s latest decision to downplay the threat of the virus struck many as shameless and irresponsible, putting concerns for his political image above public health.

“Don’t be afraid of Covid,” Trump urged on Twitter as he announced he was leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday. “Don’t let it dominate your life.”

“We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge,” he added. “I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

Arthur Caplan, director of medical ethics at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine, called Trump’s defiant tweet “a horrendously terrible message.”

“This is not what the public needs to hear,” he said. “That might be what you say if you wanted to

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