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Telling Your Kids “Don’t Smoke” Isn’t Enough

Parents are besieged nowadays by endless tasks. From Zoom-schooling their kids to keeping them entertained, their list of responsibilities is loooonnnngggg. High on that list is steering their kids clear of trouble. And that includes making sure they don’t smoke.

A new study at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) found that setting firm rules about tobacco use was more effective than just talking to children about the risks of smoking. And those rules had to apply to everyone in the home.

The five-year study following 23,000 children and teenagers aged 12 to 17 also found that parents were less likely to suspect that their child used tobacco if the kid vaped, smoked e-cigarettes or used smokeless tobacco. About 70% of the parents of children who smoked said they knew or suspected it. But only 40 percent of parents of children who used e-cigarettes were aware of it.

“We

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Don’t Store Medication in Your Bathroom Medicine Cabinet

A medicine cabinet is a great place to keep grooming tools or toiletries, but despite the name, it’s a terrible place to store medications. The temperature and humidity of a bathroom can make medications go bad more quickly than they otherwise would.



Open pill bottles viewed from overhead


© Photo: Steve Cukrov (Shutterstock)
Open pill bottles viewed from overhead

Yes, medications can expire—an expiration date will be listed somewhere on the box or bottle. But many drugs, especially those in pill form, can last for a long time (even longer than their expiration dates, in many cases)—though only if they’re stored in good conditions: cool, dry, dark places. Bathroom medicine cabinets fail two out of three: they tend to be hotspots for high temperatures and humidity.

Is It Safe to Take Expired Drugs?

Gallery: 5 Mistakes You Make Choosing a Hand Sanitizer (Best Life)

A dresser drawer or a kitchen cabinet (away from the stove, of

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If You Play Sports, Don’t Worry About Coronavirus On Your Equipment

Coronavirus has made us all more aware of the potentially contaminated surfaces on objects we once didn’t worry about touching and sharing. That includes the balls used in sports for exercise and entertainment.

Because a sports ball is usually passed from one player to the next, it could potentially act as a vector that spreads the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. A ball’s surface can become contaminated by virus particles in respiratory droplets expelled by infected people who show no symptoms (asymptomatic carriers) via breathing or sweating during physical activity, for instance.

Science has some good news about sports balls: they seem to be relatively easy to disinfect, according to a study from a mainly-British multidisciplinary group led by cancer researcher Justin Stebbing at Imperial College London and fund manager Peter Davies, non-executive chairman of Oxford Sciences Innovation.

The new study involved testing sports balls

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If You Play Sports, Don’t Worry About Coronavirus On Your Balls

Coronavirus has made us all more aware of the potentially contaminated surfaces on objects we once didn’t worry about touching and sharing. That includes the balls used in sports for exercise and entertainment.

Because a sports ball is usually passed from one player to the next, it could potentially act as a vector that spreads the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. A ball’s surface can become contaminated by virus particles in respiratory droplets expelled by infected people who show no symptoms (asymptomatic carriers) via breathing or sweating during physical activity, for instance.

Science has some good news about sports balls: they seem to be relatively easy to disinfect, according to a study from a mainly-British multidisciplinary group led by cancer researcher Justin Stebbing at Imperial College London and fund manager Peter Davies, non-executive chairman of Oxford Sciences Innovation.

The new study involved testing sports balls

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Promises Kept? On Healthcare, Trump’s Claims of ‘Monumental Steps’ Don’t Add Up

In an effort to raise his approval rating on an issue on which he trails Democrat Joe Biden in most polls, Trump on Thursday unveiled his “America First Healthcare Plan.”

This article was published on Monday, September 28, 2020 in Kaiser Health News.

By Julie Rovner and Phil Galewitz September 28, 2020

When it comes to healthcare, President Donald Trump has promised far more than he has delivered. But that doesn’t mean his administration has had no impact on health issues — including the operation of the Affordable Care Act, prescription drug prices and women’s access to reproductive health services.

In a last-ditch effort to raise his approval rating on an issue on which he trails Democrat Joe Biden in most polls, Trump on Thursday unveiled his “America First Healthcare Plan,” which includes a number of promises with no details and pumps some minor achievements into what the

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What Trump and the GOP don’t want America to know about their health care plans

The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has dramatically affected the future of our nation’s health care. The fate of Obamacare could very well be decided mere days after the election, when the Supreme Court hears arguments about its validity on Nov. 10. And without Ginsburg on the court, the conservative wing may finally have the votes to declare the landmark law unconstitutional.



a person wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a flag


© Provided by NBC News


But while health care for millions of Americans is more precarious than ever, conservative politicians are trying to gaslight voters with election-year sleight of hand. Polls show that the Affordable Care Act has become popular with both Democrats and independents, and protecting people with pre-existing conditions is supported across the board. But rather than moderate or improve their own positions, President Donald Trump and Republicans are choosing to obfuscate congressional history.

I am watching this happen with my own senator, Cory Gardner.

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Don’t let hurricanes blow you off your fitness course

Published Sep 23, 2020 at 8:00 am
(Updated Sep 23, 2020 at 9:03 am)

  • Storms are yet another reason why many exercise plans have been thwarted this year (File photograph)

    Storms are yet another reason why many exercise plans have been thwarted this year (File photograph)

Between Covid-19 and the hurricanes of the past week, many exercise plans have been thwarted.

It’s often the case that unexpected disruptions cause havoc to those of us who are creatures of routine. The ability to achieve your goals can depend on how well you manage interruption:

• Plan for change

Schedule known and potential interruptions in your calendar that could happen throughout the year. This will help identify when you may need to modify different things leading into a busier period.

When setting out goals for the next week, month or year give them a time frame that can account for something going wrong.

You likely know of upcoming birthdays or family events. Make sure to schedule them in.

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‘I hope people don’t think I’m a horrible human’: What it’s like being a stock image model

S

tock photography first began to take hold in the 1920s, with private companies building vast catalogues of professional images, which could be licensed to individual customers at a cost. In the 1990s companies sold batches of these stock photos to clients on CD Roms. Today, there are millions of photographs accessible in the digital archives of brands like Shutterstock, iStock and Getty Images, available to decorate online journalism, billboards, newsletters, and just about anything else you could need.

While the subject matter of stock photos varies from dogs playing the piano in a nightclub, to a pensioner sipping wine through a straw (wearing a face mask and surrounded by toilet roll), the final destination of the pictures is even more unpredictable. Used on everything from articles with unfortunate headlines to advertising embarrassing products – how does it feel to be the face associated with it? Especially when you have

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Many children with mental health conditions don’t get follow-up care

A large new study finds that mental health care for many children in the U.S. falls far short, particularly when it comes to the follow-up treatment they receive.

The study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examined insurance claims from children between the ages of 10 and 17 covered by Blue Cross Blue Shield. Of the more than 2 million children included in the study, nearly one in 10 had a claim related to mental illness between 2012 and 2018.

The authors found that only 71% of the children received treatment in the 3 months that followed an initial insurance claim — but the study found that rate varied widely from one ZIP code to the next. In the best-performing ZIP codes, nearly 90% of children received follow-up care within three months of an initial insurance claim. In the worst-performing areas, only half of the children

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The Editorial Board: ‘Behavioral health team’ is start on relieving police of duty they don’t need | Editorial



Henley

Monique Henley, daughter of Willie Henley, who was shot by Buffalo police after police say he hit an officer with a baseball bat, embraces a supporter during a protest in Martin Luther King Jr. Park on Sunday.


Derek Gee



Mayor Byron W. Brown’s announcement about a “behavioral health team” came too late for the man carrying an aluminum baseball bat and walking the city streets. Its establishment is a step in the right direction, but it’s time to take the responsibility for dealing with the mentally ill off the shoulders of police.

Willie N. Henley, 60, was shot by a police officer at Genesee and Ash streets after he allegedly swung the bat and hit the officer’s female partner. Henley was in stable condition shortly after the Sept. 12 incident. He faces one count of second-degree assault and one count of third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, according to District

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