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Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn’t classify Roe v Wade as ‘superprecedent’

Welcome to Tuesday’s Overnight Health Care.



a woman smiling for the camera: Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she's 'not hostile' toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn't classify Roe v Wade as 'superprecedent' | Eli Lilly pauses study of COVID-19 treatment over safety concerns


© Greg Nash
Overnight Health Care: Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act | Nominee says she doesn’t classify Roe v Wade as ‘superprecedent’ | Eli Lilly pauses study of COVID-19 treatment over safety concerns

Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett faced questions in her Senate confirmation hearing about her views on the Affordable Care Act and Roe v. Wade but did not give much away. Mitch McConnell is going to force a vote on “targeted” COVID-19 relief next week, and Trump has decided to pick a fight with Anthony Fauci.

We’ll start with Barrett:

Barrett says she’s ‘not hostile’ toward Affordable Care Act

Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Tuesday that she is “not hostile” toward the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as Senate Democrats pressed her during a confirmation hearing about the implications for the health care law if

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Barrett doesn’t recall Trump health-care remarks

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (all times local):

7:20 p.m.

Amy Coney Barrett says she doesn’t recall seeing President Donald Trump’s statements that he planned to nominate Supreme Court justices who would repeal the Affordable Care Act prior to her nomination for an open seat.

Her comments came in response to questions from Sen. Kamala Harris of California, the Democratic nominee for vice president. Harris questioned Barrett via video stream from her office in the Capitol rather than attend in person due to coronavirus concerns.

Asked if she was aware of Trump’s comments before her nomination, Barrett said she could not give a yes or no answer.


“I don’t recall hearing about or seeing such statements,” she said.

She later said Democratic senators may have referenced Trump’s comments during conversations after her nomination but prior to her confirmation

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What the health-privacy law does (and doesn’t) protect

The clamor for information about President Donald Trump’s COVID-19 prognosis once again thrust HIPAA, a decades-old health-privacy law, into the spotlight. But it’s worth understanding what patient information the federal law does and doesn’t protect — and when it’s completely irrelevant to the topic at hand.

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HIPAA, short for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, was enacted in 1996 and went into effect in 2003. Broadly speaking, it is a federal health-care privacy law that shields individuals’ protected health information from release by health-care providers without the individual’s permission, Margaret Foster Riley, a professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law, told MarketWatch.

Its rules “essentially provide for the privacy and security of personal health information held by traditional health-care providers — so doctors, hospitals, pharmacies,” said Nicolas Terry, the executive director of the Hall Center for Law and Health at Indiana University. “It

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Debunking the ‘Trump Doesn’t Have a Health Care Plan’ Myth

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Posted: Oct 06, 2020 12:01 AM

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.

My Democrat friends foisted this refrain upon me after I attended President Trump’s announcement of his health care plan in North Carolina. I posted about it on social media, along with the transcript of his speech and the outline of his plan. How could they claim he didn’t have a health care plan? It was there in writing. Apparently, that wasn’t enough, and it wouldn’t be until the government had more control.

“It’s not a ‘plan’ because you can’t sign-up for it,” someone snidely retorted.

I realized then we held two different views of what constitutes a health care plan—and what it means for the American people.

To consider it a “plan,” my progressive friends would need President Trump to create and offer an overarching outline

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Marshall campaign doesn’t offer health benefits to staff

The bulk of Kansas Republican Rep. Roger Marshall’s Senate campaign team have health insurance because of the law their boss and other Republicans have repeatedly sought to repeal.

Marshall’s campaign staff are independent contractors rather than employees. It means that the campaign does not have to pay thousands in payroll taxes on their salaries or provide them health benefits.

But because most of them are 26 or younger, they can stay on their parents’ health insurance plans under a provision in the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Eric Pahls, Marshall’s campaign manager, said despite not offering health benefits the campaign works “with each team member to make sure they have what they need for health care, housing and transportation. We’re proud of our team, and glad to compensate them for their hard work.”

For the most part, the members of Marshall’s campaign team have simply remained on

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AOC Condemns U.S. System That Allows Trump, Amazon to Pay Almost No Taxes But Doesn’t Fund Health Care For All

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Tuesday criticized the U.S. system that enables large companies like Amazon and high-profile business leaders like President Donald Trump to pay little or no federal income tax.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, D.C. According to a recent report by The New York Times, Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes in 2016, the year he won the election. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez criticized the U.S. tax system in a tweet on Tuesday in response to the Times' investigation.


© BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images
President Donald Trump speaks during a briefing at the White House September 27, 2020, in Washington, D.C. According to a recent report by The New York Times, Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes in 2016, the year he won the election. Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez criticized the U.S. tax system in a tweet on Tuesday in response to the Times’ investigation.

The representative for New York’s 14th District said she couldn’t understand the people who both defend the country’s tax system and question how changes to the health care system and other progressive initiatives could be funded.

“The nerve of people who ask ‘how are you going to pay for it?’ whenever

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Trump unveils “bogus” health care “plan” that doesn’t actually do anything

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

U.S. President Donald Trump reacts after signing an executive order following his remarks on his healthcare policies on September 24, 2020 in Charlotte, North Carolina. Trump’s trip to North Carolina marks his fifth time in the state within the last 30 days. Brian Blanco/Getty Images

President Donald Trump unveiled his long-anticipated health care “plan” on Thursday, but it was comprised of only two toothless executive orders. Journalists and politicians alike were quick to point out that the pair of orders did not actually compromise a “plan” at all, as they were merely “requests for legislation.”

Trump, who repeatedly failed to repeal the Affordable Care Act despite years of promises, claimed on Thursday that “Obamacare is no longer Obamacare” after Republicans tossed the individual mandate penalty. He made the comment while rolling out his “America First Health Plan,” which The Washington Post noted was not actually a “plan.”

“We’ve

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