disparities

Disparities among cardiovascular professionals continue to exist, shows study

Despite working for more than two decades to address underrepresentation of women in cardiology, disparities among cardiovascular professionals continue to exist.

Profound inequities also exist for individuals underrepresented in medicine, such as African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans, who constitute 32 percent of the U.S. population but only eight percent of practicing cardiologists.

The disparities amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic present disturbing evidence that we are far from cardiovascular healthcare equity in the work place. Individuals, leaders and institutions must prioritize research, policies, and structures to advance diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging that is essential to advancing workforce excellence and cardiovascular health.”


Emelia J. Benjamin, MD, ScM, Study Corresponding Author and Professor, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine

Diversity and equity in the health-care workforce have been shown to benefit patients and increase access to

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The mental health disparities faced by people of color

World Mental Health Day: The mental health disparities faced by people of color

Racism and stigma make it harder for people of color to get services, and it’s gotten worse during the coronavirus pandemic.

Published October 10, 2020

Richelle Concepcion still remembers the name she was called after trying to stop a White kid who was picking on younger peers on the swim team in high school.

“Shut the f**k up, you Oriental b*tch!” that kid yelled at her so many years ago.

Though Concepcion, a Filipina American, wasn’t the only person teased by that kid at her school in San Francisco, she was the only one called a racial slur.

“After that event, I spent time ruminating on the experience and went over scenarios in my head about what I could have said back, whether I was indeed what he called me, etc.,” said Concepcion,

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Senate Report Highlights Pandemic’s Racial Disparities : Shots

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking member of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, issued a report on racial disparities and COVID-19 calling for congressional action.

Zach Gibson/Getty Images


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Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., ranking member of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, issued a report on racial disparities and COVID-19 calling for congressional action.

Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The disproportionate harm people of color have suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic serves as an “appalling reminder of the deep inequities” of the American health care system and demands congressional remedies, according to a new Senate committee report.

The report cites research showing that Black people are dying from COVID-19 at 3.4 times the rate of white people, when adjusted for age. It notes that COVID-19 accounts for 1 in 5 deaths among Latinos. And American Indian or Alaska Native patients are hospitalized at more

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Award supports study of collagen regulation in breast cancer health disparities

IMAGE

IMAGE: Examples of collagen spatial distribution in triple negative breast cancer found by using imaging mass spectrometry.
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Credit: Medical University of South Carolina

An MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher received a $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study how patterns of collagens can serve as biomarkers of breast cancer risk and potentially reveal clues to what might be driving health disparities.

Peggi Angel, Ph.D., is applying innovative proteomic profiling techniques to decipher the biological foundations of lethal breast cancers that impact African American women more than any other race or ethnicity. Alarmingly, African American women are more than twice as likely as white women of European descent to be diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer characterized by triple negative tumor subtypes that are more likely to metastasize, seeding tumor growth in other areas of their bodies and complicating the treatments they receive.

Angel

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Gift Of Life Marrow Registry And NAACP Join Together To Reduce Healthcare Disparities

Gift Of Life Marrow Registry And NAACP Join Together To Reduce Healthcare Disparities

PR Newswire

BOCA RATON, Fla., Sept. 24, 2020

Virtual Town Hall series launches September 30 at 2:00 pm ET

Registration at www.giftoflife.org/virtualtownhall

BOCA RATON, Fla., Sept. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The COVID-19 pandemic and recent racial turmoil have brought to the national forefront systemic racial and social inequities that create heath disparities that devastate families and communities of color throughout the U.S. In response to this public health crisis, Gift of Life Marrow Registry, an organization dedicated to equal outcomes of health for everyone, has joined together with the NAACP and its Youth and College Division to host a series of virtual town halls, “Education In Action: Addressing Healthcare Disparities in Our Communities,” aimed at equipping and empowering student-led communities to effect change.

Gift of Life Marrow Registry and the NAACP to host virtual town hall on healthcare disparities on September 30, 2PM ET.
Gift of Life Marrow Registry and the NAACP to host virtual town hall
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Bundled payment model reduces health disparities for Black patients

A new nationwide model of care for hip and knee joint replacements appears to reduce disparities in health outcomes for Black patients, according to new research led by Oregon Health & Science University.

Researchers examined health outcomes for about 700,000 patients who underwent joint replacement procedures through Medicare between 2013 and 2017. The study examined differences in outcomes before and after April 2016, when Medicare adopted a model called Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement, a bundled payment model designed to reduce spending and improve outcomes for all joint replacement patients.

The review is published by the journal JAMA Network Open.

The retrospective study examined three key metrics: spending, discharges to institutional post-acute care and hospital readmission. It compared outcomes for patients self-identified as white, Black and Hispanic.

Taken together, the results showed improved outcomes for Black patients and mixed results for Hispanic patients compared with those who are white.

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