Democrats

Barrett Avoids Slips as Democrats Press on Abortion, Health Care

(Bloomberg) — Democrats grilled U.S. Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett for hours about abortion rights, health-care law, guns and election disputes but made little progress derailing her likely Senate confirmation and a strengthened conservative majority on the court.



a man and a woman standing in front of a microphone: Amy Coney Barrett swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.


© Bloomberg
Amy Coney Barrett swears in to a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 12.

Barrett refused to say on Tuesday whether she would disqualify herself from any disputes over the impending presidential election and offered no hints on how she would vote if the court reconsiders the landmark abortion case Roe v. Wade. In the second day of her Senate Judiciary Committee hearings, she also parried questions on gun rights, the general fate of longstanding Supreme Court precedents and the Affordable Care Act.

Barrett told senators she made no promises to President Donald Trump about how she would vote on an ACA case the

Read More

Democrats say Barrett is a threat to health care, election rulings

Washington

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators’ questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent, and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to lock in a conservative court majority for years to come.

The mood is likely to shift to a more confrontational tone as Judge Barrett, an appellate court judge with very little trial court experience, is grilled in 30-minute segments Tuesday by Democrats gravely opposed to President Donald Trump’s nominee, yet virtually powerless to stop her rise. Republicans are rushing her to confirmation before Election Day.

“This should not be President Trump’s judge,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Democrats say the winner of the presidential election should choose the nominee.

“This should be your judge,” she said.

Judge Barrett presented her approach to the law as conservative and fair on

Read More

Barrett vows to interpret laws ‘as they are written,’ as Democrats warn of threat to health care

“Courts are not designed to solve every problem or right every wrong in our public life,” declared the 48-year-old federal appeals court judge, removing the protective mask she wore most of the day to read from a prepared statement.

Americans “deserve an independent Supreme Court that interprets our Constitution and laws as they are written,” Barrett told the Senate Judiciary Committee, laying out her judicial philosophy, which she has likened to that of her conservative mentor, the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

The Senate, led by Trump’s Republican allies, is pushing Barrett’s nomination to a quick vote before Election Day, Nov. 3, and ahead of the latest challenge to the Affordable Care Act, which the Supreme Court is to hear a week after the election.

Republicans also hope to seat Barrett quickly enough to hear any legal challenges after the election. Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut was among several Democrats demanding

Read More

Amy Coney Barrett confirmation: Trump’s nominee vows to be apolitical as Democrats warn of threat to health care

Democrats acknowledged there is little they can do to stop Barrett’s confirmation. So they seemed determined to use the hearings to portray Republicans as a threat to the Affordable Care Act and the nomination as a last-ditch effort to save Trump should next month’s election lead to litigation in the Supreme Court.

On optics alone, Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) seemed to speak for everyone when he said, “There is nothing about this that is normal.”

The nominee, who spoke for just 12 minutes, wore a black mask for nearly the entire hearing. Several members of the Senate Judiciary Committee participated remotely, one because he has tested positive for the novel coronavirus. In a first, the Architect of the Capitol submitted a letter certifying that the hearing room met Centers for Disease Control and Prevention safety regulations.

And when the 48-year-old Barrett, nominated by Trump after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death

Read More

Where do Democrats stand on health care price transparency?

COVID-19 has exacerbated the Achilles’ heel of our health care system: medical billing. Surprise charges abound in the wake of diagnostic testing, a problem President Trump is seeking to fix with a recent executive order that Republican lawmakers are endeavoring to codify, and a health care plan that puts transparency at the forefront of the conversation. 

“By improving transparency, we can increase competition, empower patients, and ultimately lower health care costs. I’m glad to join my colleagues in support of this bill which is a critical step toward achieving these important goals,” Sen. Jon Ernst, Iowa Republican, one of 11 sponsoring the bill, said in a statement.

The legislation, titled “The Health Care PRICE Transparency Act,” would require hospitals and medical providers to advertise the cost of their services, as well as negotiated third-party rates, ahead of treatment. The issue has widespread support, especially among women and Democrats, yet

Read More

Barrett Vows Fair Approach as Justice, Democrats Skeptical | Washington, D.C. News

By MARK SHERMAN, LISA MASCARO and MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett presented her conservative approach to the law Monday at the start of fast-tracked confirmation hearings, while Democrats, powerless to stop her, tried to cast her as a threat to Americans’ health care coverage during the coronavirus pandemic.

With her large family sitting behind her in a hearing room off-limits to the public and altered for COVID-19 risks, Barrett delivered views at odds with the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose seat President Donald Trump nominated her to fill, likely before Election Day.

“Courts are not designed to solve every problem or right every wrong in our public life,” declared the 48-year-old federal appeals court judge, removing the protective mask she wore most of the day to read from a prepared statement.

Americans “deserve an independent Supreme Court that interprets our

Read More

On Day One of Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court Hearing, Democrats Focus on Health Care

During the first day of Amy Coney Barrett‘s Supreme Court hearing, Democrats revealed their main focus for the week as senators debate her confirmation: health care.



a person standing in front of a crowd posing for the camera: Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in during the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, DC, on October 12, 2020.


© Erin Schaff—Getty Images
Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in during the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in the Hart Senate Office Building in Washington, DC, on October 12, 2020.

During the course of the day, every single Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee mentioned health care in their opening remarks. In a show of disciplined messaging, they honed in on fears that Barrett would overturn the Affordable Care Act (ACA) if she were confirmed to the Supreme Court — which is set to hear a case about the constitutionality of the Obama-era health care law just one week after Election Day.

“Health care coverage for millions of Americans is at stake with this nomination,” California Sen. Dianne

Read More

With eye on election, Democrats hammer health care on first day of Barrett hearing

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats came to the first day of the Supreme Court hearings Monday with a singular message: Health care coverage and protections for millions of Americans are at risk if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed.

Like a choir singing in unison, Democrats carried the same tune, in different vocal ranges. Each showed photos of constituents who have battled illness and stand to lose potential lifesaving treatment if the Affordable Care Act were axed, demonstrating an unusual level of harmony for a party not known for message discipline.

The relentless attacks were aimed at exploiting the GOP’s Achilles’ heel in the election — a pandemic-weary public that continues to cite health care as a top issue and trusts Democrats more on the topic. Without the votes to stop Republicans from confirming Barrett, 48, to a lifetime appointment on the court, Democrats are seeking to maximize their revenge at the

Read More

Barrett nomination hearing begins as Democrats focus on health care

The confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett began Monday morning, with Democrats focusing on what her vote could mean for the Affordable Care Act, which is being challenged by the Trump administration and a number of Republican states in a case coming before the court this term.

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee came equipped with large posters showing photos of Americans who they say would lose their health care if the Supreme Court were to overturn the ACA, also known as Obamacare. Barrett has written she disagrees with Chief Justice John Roberts’s 2012 opinion that upheld the ACA. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last month, was in the majority upholding the ACA in the case eight years ago.

Republicans in their opening statements highlighted Barrett’s academic qualifications and her prolific career as a law professor and judge, while raising seven children. Democrats kept their focus

Read More

Democrats Use Supreme Court Fight to Elevate Health Care in Campaign

(Bloomberg) — Senate Democrats are prepared to lose the fight over Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination to the Supreme Court, but her confirmation hearings give them a platform to highlight a timely issue just before the election: health care.



a woman who is smiling and looking at the camera: Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump's nominee for associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, meets with Senator Kevin Cramer, a Republican from North Dakota, not pictured, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S.


© Bloomberg
Amy Coney Barrett, U.S. President Donald Trump’s nominee for associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, meets with Senator Kevin Cramer, a Republican from North Dakota, not pictured, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., U.S.

More than almost any other issue, Democrats say the fate of the Affordable Care Act in the middle of a pandemic will drive home the stakes of GOP control of the White House and Senate.

Loading...

Load Error

If Republican plans for Barrett’s confirmation hold, she would be on the court when it hears arguments just one week after the Nov. 3 election in a case that could undo the law, which provides health insurance

Read More