College

Beyond the Stigma: Mental health challenges at college during a pandemic (Commentary)

Jim Malatras has been the chancellor of the State University of New York system since August 2020. From July 2019 until his appointment as chancellor, he was president of SUNY’s Empire State College.

There is often a lot of pressure and anxiety that comes with being a college student. While mental health issues among college students are not new, the Covid-19 pandemic is exacerbating them. In a study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in late June, 63% of 18-to-24-year-olds reported experiencing symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the prevalence of depression among graduate and professional students is two times higher in 2020 compared to 2019.

But like the great diversity of our students at one of our 64 campuses across the state, there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Institutions must enlist health professionals in their community, maximize touchpoints and support layers, mobilize young people who want to

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The College of Health Care Professions Named as San Antonio Express-News 2020 Top Workplace Winner

SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The College of Health Care Professions (CHCP), a trailblazer in the delivery of allied health education that offers accredited stackable degree and certificate programs aligned to the region’s fastest-growing healthcare fields, has been named The San Antonio Express-News Top Workplace winner. This is the third year in a row CHCP’s San Antonio and South San Antonio campuses were recognized on the Top Workplace list.

“This award highlights the hard work of the entire San Antonio team whose leadership inspires and motivates students to achieve their career goals,” said Eric Bing, chief executive officer of CHCP. “Our faculty and staff are the bedrock of our work to help aspiring professionals find success in careers throughout their lives.”

CHCP was recently featured on the podcast, A Model to Watch, where Bing discusses student wellbeing during the pandemic, how CHCP has designed its

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Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions Announces a New College of Optometry and Appoints Adam Hickenbotham as Dean

Addressing the shortage of optometry colleges in the Western U.S., Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions (RMUoHP) announced an intent to develop a new College of Optometry on the RMUoHP campus with Dr. Adam Hickenbotham, OD, MPH, PhD, selected as the Founding Dean. <see full announcement> <Photo>

As Dean, Hickenbotham will oversee the development of the curriculum, the hiring of faculty and staff, and guide the new college through the accreditation process in preparation for an anticipated opening in 2023. The College of Optometry is seeking accreditation through the Accreditation Council on Optometric Education, a multistage process before a new school can begin to recruit or enroll students.

“We are pleased Dr. Hickenbotham, one of the leading experts and groundbreakers in optometry, will lead our efforts in starting our College of Optometry,” said Dr. Richard P. Nielsen, founding president and CEO of RMUoHP. “The College will offer the traditional training

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Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions appoints dean of new optometry college





© Provided by KUTV Salt Lake City


Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions announced an intent to develop a new College of Optometry with Dr. Adam Hickenbotham, OD, MPH, PhD, as the founding dean.

As dean, Hickenbotham will oversee the development of the curriculum, the hiring of faculty and staff, and guide the new college through the accreditation process in preparation for an anticipated opening in 2023. 



a man wearing a suit and tie


© Provided by KUTV Salt Lake City


The College of Optometry is seeking accreditation through the Accreditation Council on Optometric Education, requiring a multistage process before a new school can begin to recruit or enroll students, a press release stated.

Dr. Richard P. Nielsen, founding president and CEO of Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions, said in a prepared statement:

We are pleased Dr. Hickenbotham, one of the leading experts and groundbreakers in optometry, will lead our efforts in starting our College of

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College students suffering from mental health issues at a higher pace during pandemic

A survey of more than 12,000 students found that 85% of students are more stressed as a result of the pandemic compared to 2019.

SAN DIEGO — A huge majority of college students are reporting feeling more stressed as they try to begin a new year amid a global pandemic.

At San Diego State a small portion of students are returning to the classroom on Monday.

It’s been a tumultuous school year so far with 1,170 COVID-19 cases related to the university among students and staff. The cases have lead to classroom closures and quarantining of several students.

It may not come as much of a surprise the mental health of students is much worse this year because of the pandemic.

Freshman Hannah O’Campo at SDSU said, “It’s been stressful. I feel like I have to teach myself a lot. Alexis Zepeda added, “It’s been really crazy, online school is

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3 Vital Tips for College Students Who Are Struggling With Mental Health

Photo credit: bymuratdeniz - Getty Images
Photo credit: bymuratdeniz – Getty Images

From Seventeen

Mental health issues are on the rise in colleges throughout America.

One in five students have reported having suicidal thoughts, according to a Harvard Medical School study. Among gay, lesbian, and bisexual students, suicide attempts have increased more than 25 percent since 2009. But there’s hope for those struggling.

Thrive Global, a behavior change media and technology company, spoke with B. Janet Hibbs, Ph.D., a family psychologist and co-author of The Stressed Years of Their Lives: Helping Your Kid Survive and Thrive During Their College Years, about dealing with “the sky is falling” anxiety.

Here are some steps college students can take to control their symptoms before their anxiety and depression becomes a bigger problem and requires intervention.

Develop healthy habits.

Photo credit: xia yuan - Getty Images
Photo credit: xia yuan – Getty Images

Regular exercise, eating nutritious foods, and getting good amounts of sleep (about 8

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Rep. Horn & dean of OU’s Hudson College of Public Health to host virtual healthcare town hall

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Rep. Kendra Horn and an official from the University of Oklahoma’s Hudson College of Public Health will hold a Healthcare Town Hall to discuss COVID-19 and other healthcare concerns.

Horn (OK-5) and Dr. Gary Raskob, Dean of the Hudson College of Public Health, will gather with public health officials, hospital administrators and healthcare leaders for the town hall, which will cover COVID-19 updates, the rising cost of prescription drugs and access to affordable quality healthcare.

The town hall will be streamed live from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 9, on Horn’s official Facebook page.

“As COVID-19 cases spike in Oklahoma, we have to listen to the advice and guidance of our public health professionals to save lives and ignite the economy,” Horn said. “I am proud to bring together this panel of doctors, public

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College Mental Health & COVID-19

This post was co-written with by college mental health lead Jennifer Melcher of the BIDMC Division of Digital Psychiatry at BIDMC.

The mental health of students remains a growing concern on college campuses. Students are experiencing elevated rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation, with recent CDC data revealing these trends are only worsening during the COVID-19 pandemic. 62.9% of survey respondents aged 18-24 (college aged) met the criteria for an anxiety or depressive disorder and 25.5% of respondents reported that they had seriously considered suicide within the past 30 days. Colleges that previously struggled to meet the demand for face-to-face counseling on campus are now faced with the challenge of supporting students’ mental health remotely. There is a clear need for scalable digital technologies to support students’ mental health, yet even today the resources that colleges are offering may not be lining up with students’ needs.

Our Research

Our

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OU college of medicine plans mobile classroom to promote diversity in health professions

OKLAHOMA CITY — A large RV, customized as a health education classroom on wheels, is among the new projects the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine plans with a $2.8 million grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration.

The grant is a one-year supplement that augments an initial $4.7 million award to the OU College of Medicine last year. The aim of the grant is to recruit, retain and admit students from rural, tribal and medically underserved areas, and to expand the primary care experience among current medical students. Data shows that students from those groups who attend medical school and residency in Oklahoma are more likely to return to their communities to practice medicine.

“Of Oklahoma’s 77 counties, 76 have a shortage of primary care physicians, and the need is particularly great in rural areas, underserved communities and tribes. The ultimate goal of this grant is to

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Supporting The Mental Health of College Students During The Pandemic And Beyond

Last year, I wrote about the mental health crisis confronting America’s college and university students. Students are lonely and anxious, I noted then, and according to one major study more than 75 percent of college students said they needed help for emotional and mental health problems.

Then the pandemic happened.

Students’ lives were disrupted as classes moved remote, residence halls shut down, and in some cases family members got sick, lost jobs, or even lost their lives. We faced a national reckoning about systemic racism. School is back in session now, but in a drastically changed world. And problems of student mental health have only increased.

A Boston University study last month found that depression symptoms have tripled among American adults, including college students. Now, 27.8 percent of American adults display symptoms of depression, the study found, compared to 8.5 percent prior to the pandemic. And students face special challenges.

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