collagen

Award supports study of collagen regulation in breast cancer health disparities

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IMAGE: Examples of collagen spatial distribution in triple negative breast cancer found by using imaging mass spectrometry.
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Credit: Medical University of South Carolina

An MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher received a $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study how patterns of collagens can serve as biomarkers of breast cancer risk and potentially reveal clues to what might be driving health disparities.

Peggi Angel, Ph.D., is applying innovative proteomic profiling techniques to decipher the biological foundations of lethal breast cancers that impact African American women more than any other race or ethnicity. Alarmingly, African American women are more than twice as likely as white women of European descent to be diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer characterized by triple negative tumor subtypes that are more likely to metastasize, seeding tumor growth in other areas of their bodies and complicating the treatments they receive.

Angel

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