claims

Peter Meijer, Hillary Scholten clash over health care, ‘misleading’ claims in Congressional debate

GRAND RAPIDS, MI — Republican Peter Meijer and Democrat Hillary Scholten, who are vying to replace U.S. Rep. Justin Amash in Congress, spared over health care and “misleading” campaign advertisements in a debate Thursday night but found common ground on the need for a second coronavirus stimulus package.

One of the biggest topics of the debate, broadcast on WOOD-TV, was the Affordable Care Act.

Scholten, who worked at the Department of Justice during the Obama administration, criticized Meijer for pledging to support a repeal of the health care law if elected. Meijer has signed a pledge from the conservative group, Campaign for Liberty, that stated he would “support legislation to fully repeal ObamaCare and oppose efforts to give the federal government more control of health care.”

“A million people in Michigan would lose their health care coverage without this law,” said Scholten, 38. “It is so crucial that we fight

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AP FACT CHECK: Trump’s dubious claims on health care, court

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President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Harrisburg International Airport, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, in Middletown, Pa.

AP

President Donald Trump isn’t providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if “Obamacare” is ruled unconstitutional.

Eager to get conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett quickly confirmed to the Supreme Court, which is hearing his challenge to the Affordable Care Act, Trump asserts that “far cheaper” and “much better” plans will replace the Obama-era law. He also points to a new executive order offering protections. But his claims are illusory.

Various GOP bills, in fact, have been seen over the years as providing less than what “Obamacare” already provided, and it’s unlikely an executive order will have much effect.

In a momentous past week, Trump painted a fantastical portrait of a coronavirus that affects “virtually

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Promises Kept? On Healthcare, Trump’s Claims of ‘Monumental Steps’ Don’t Add Up

In an effort to raise his approval rating on an issue on which he trails Democrat Joe Biden in most polls, Trump on Thursday unveiled his “America First Healthcare Plan.”

This article was published on Monday, September 28, 2020 in Kaiser Health News.

By Julie Rovner and Phil Galewitz September 28, 2020

When it comes to healthcare, President Donald Trump has promised far more than he has delivered. But that doesn’t mean his administration has had no impact on health issues — including the operation of the Affordable Care Act, prescription drug prices and women’s access to reproductive health services.

In a last-ditch effort to raise his approval rating on an issue on which he trails Democrat Joe Biden in most polls, Trump on Thursday unveiled his “America First Healthcare Plan,” which includes a number of promises with no details and pumps some minor achievements into what the

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Fact-checking Trump’s recent claims on health care, the Supreme Court and more | Govt-and-politics

TRUMP, on the coronavirus: “We’re rounding the turn.” — interview aired Sunday on Fox News Channel.

TRUMP: “We’re rounding the corner — with or without a vaccine.” — interview on “Fox & Friends” on Sept. 21.

TRUMP, asked if the virus will “go away” if there isn’t a vaccine immediately available: “Sure, with time it goes away. And you’ll develop — you’ll develop herd-like, a herd mentality. It’s going to be — it’s going to be herd-developed, and that’s going to happen.” — ABC News town hall on Sept. 15.

THE FACTS: Trump appeared to promote a “herd immunity” approach to the virus if a vaccine isn’t immediately available that would require millions more people to get infected and significantly higher deaths.



APTOPIX Election 2020 Trump

Supporters of President Donald Trump cheer as he arrives to speak during a campaign rally at Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020, in Moon Township, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


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What led Healthcare Claims Management Market 2025 to mark 11160 Million USD with CAGR of 2.8 %

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 28, 2020 (Market Insight Reports) —
Selbyville, Delaware. The report Healthcare Claims Management Market Analysis and forecast 2025 maintains enhanced dynamics and is overshadowed by a top player across the globe. The research report provides Healthcare Claims Management Market analysis and information corresponding to market segments such as geographies, product type, application, and end-use industry. Experts use the most recent Healthcare Claims Management Market research techniques and tools to assemble widespread and precise marketing research reports. A detailed outline about Healthcare Claims Management market size and share were combined in this report which gives a comprehensive analysis of different verticals of businesses.

The ratio of shares and breakdowns are defined using verified primary sources. The Healthcare Claims Management Market forecast report could be a collection of first-hand info, qualitative and quantitative assessment by Healthcare Claims Management

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AP FACT CHECK: Trump’s dubious claims on health care, court


WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn’t providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if “Obamacare” is ruled unconstitutional.

Eager to get conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett quickly confirmed to the Supreme Court, which is hearing his challenge to the Affordable Care Act,

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Brain surgery patient ‘furious’ as Queensland Chief Health Officer claims hotel offers better care than home quarantine

Queensland’s Health Minister has promised to investigate after a Toowoomba father of two, who was denied home quarantine after major brain surgery interstate, hit back at the Chief Health Officer for saying he is receiving better care in a medi-hotel.

Just over a week ago, David Jonsson was learning to walk again after having a brain tumour removed in Sydney last month.

Despite advice from his surgeon Charlie Teo that he should recover and rehabilitate at home, Mr Jonsson had to enter hotel quarantine when he returned to Queensland last week.

Queensland’s Chief Health Officer Jeannette Young described the Brisbane hotel where Mr Jonsson was staying as a “hospital in a hotel”, which prompted an angry backlash from Mr Jonsson and his wife.

“I did hear [Dr Young] say I’d have access to a physio, which is just not happening,” Mr Jonsson said.

“The only medical people I’ve seen is

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Fact-checking Trump’s town hall health care claims

President Trump was in the spotlight Tuesday night for a rare town hall in Philadelphia with undecided voters, where he fielded questions on topics including the coronavirus pandemic and health care, which have been on the minds of many voters. 

He made a variety of claims about the health care system, health care proposals and the scientific realities of COVID-19. Here are some of the highlights, as well as fact checking and context for his statements.

Mr. Trump repeated a claim Tuesday night he has made in the past — that COVID-19 is “probably going to go away now a lot faster because of the vaccine” but “would go away without the vaccine.”

When ABC News moderator George Stephanopoulos asked the president to clarify if he believes the virus will go away without a vaccine, Mr. Trump responded, “Sure, over a period of time.”

Mr. Trump said in February

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Fact-check: Biden makes misleading claims on health care, coronavirus at town hall


At Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s town hall Thursday, he repeated a claim about people with preexisting conditions and coverage.

Our partners at FactCheck.org call it misleading.

“One hundred million people with preexisting conditions like your mom would not have to pay more for their insurance under now, but guess what happens if in fact he wins,” Biden said.

But the 100 million figure is an estimate for the number of Americans — outside of Medicare and Medicaid — who have preexisting conditions.


Without the Affordable Care Act, those people would lose the preexisting condition protections.

But not all of them would lose all of their coverage. That’s a much smaller amount, 6% (6 million people), who only get insurance from the individual market.



In another issue regarding health, the former vice president blamed President Donald Trump on

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