dentistry for children

Answer Line: Dentist had 40-year career in Longview | Answer Line

QUESTION: Back in the ‘50s, I know there was a black dentist who had an office here, if you’re going south on Green Street, just south of the railroad track, named Dr. Brown. I don’t know what his first name was, but I do know he was here in the mid- to early ‘50s. I was trying to find out for sure if he was in the running for being the first black dentist in Longview. Dr. Brown did some work for me when I was a teenager. Can you please see if you can find any information on him?

ANSWER: This is my favorite question this year. (It’s possible I’ve already said this at least once this year, but who’s counting?) I love it because it feels like we’ve found a missing page of our history.

I would say he’s definitely in the running to be declared

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The pandemic is a once-in-a-generation test for Philly moms. Most say they’re failing

Cassie Gafford never thought of herself as a stay-at-home mom. She spent years training to become a dentist, then working and teaching in the field.



a person sitting on a bench in front of a building: Cassandra Gafford in the backyard of her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She worried going back to work as a dentist in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger.


© JESSICA GRIFFIN/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Cassandra Gafford in the backyard of her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She worried going back to work as a dentist in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger.

Then, this summer, she quit.

Gafford, 32, of Logan Square, worried going back to work in a pandemic would put her whole family in danger — and putting her 22-month-old daughter in day care didn’t seem safe either, since she’d already survived a frightening case of pneumonia in January.



a person standing on a sidewalk: Tamika Diggs outside her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She works nights as a concierge at a luxury apartment building. She finishes her shift at 3 a.m., then Ubers home to West Philadelphia, where she helps her sons with their work hours later.


© JESSICA GRIFFIN/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
Tamika Diggs outside her home in Philadelphia, September 25, 2020. She works nights as a concierge at a luxury apartment building. She finishes her shift at 3 a.m., then Ubers home to West Philadelphia,

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The humble Farmer: For a storyteller, even the dentist is something to look forward to

Life is not fair. Many people have built barns that were carried away by violent storms just a few months later.

We recently experienced a similar injustice very close to our home. We knew it was coming. For weeks the DOT people were out on the road between Port Clyde and Thomaston, measuring, marking, scraping back the weeds and prepping the crumbled bicycle shoulders. And yesterday the road resurfacing crew went by our driveway with their big machines and put down a half-inch of hot top.

You can understand that they covered the dozens of black tire marks children have made on the road with their monster trucks over the past year. Each one is a proud personal signature that will have to be restored at a great cost in effort and tire tread.

Can you imagine how Michelangelo would have felt if someone had put whitewash over the Volta

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The Block star Jess Eva reveals new look after dentist horror

Block star Jess Eva had previously said if there was one thing she could change about herself, it would be her teeth.

“I hate my teeth,” she said in an interview with WHO magazine in 2018.

But after 25 years of having never visited a dentist, the reality star finally built the courage to go — unveiling her flashy set of pearly whites.

Talking on her Triple M radio show Moonman in the Morning this week, Eva told her co-hosts Lawrence Mooney and Chris Page she hadn’t visited a dentist in more than two decades because of a traumatising childhood experience.

RELATED: Block stars have blown entire winnings

She explained that her fear started “in the school dental van”, where the trainee dentists from her local area would practise on children.

“They would rock up outside the school and because they’re still training (it’s not their fault) they would say

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Dentistry for Kids | UMKC

We enjoy working with all of our young patients and are aware that they have different needs when seeing the dentist. We try not to push children so they wind up afraid of going to the dentist. We’d like their appointment to be as enjoyable and comfortable as possible, as well as for them to establish life-long relationships with our dental practice.

We also recommend that the little one’s first visit be between twenty four months and 3 years of age. At that age we will start to monitor the growth and progression of their mouth and teeth.

When New Teeth Arrive:

Your child’s first tooth erupts between ages 6-12 months and the remainder of their 20 primary or “baby” teeth typically erupt by age 3. During this time, gums may feel tender and sore, causing your child to feel irritable. To help alleviate this discomfort, we recommend that you

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Dentistry ‘faces resourcing crisis as skilled staff move to testing and tracing’



a person wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Dr Anne O’Neill, incoming president of the Irish Dental Association (IDA), warned that the public service dentistry is facing a resourcing crisis (PA)Picture supplied by Gordon MRM.


© Provided by PA Media
Dr Anne O’Neill, incoming president of the Irish Dental Association (IDA), warned that the public service dentistry is facing a resourcing crisis (PA)Picture supplied by Gordon MRM.

The public service dentistry is facing a resourcing crisis, the incoming president of the Irish Dental Association (IDA) has warned.

Dr Anne O’Neill said their resourcing levels have become a full-blown crisis.

The HSE Community Dental Service deals with vulnerable special needs patients and children. However, according to the IDA members’ survey, between 25% and 40% of its skilled staff have been assigned to testing and contact tracing for Covid-19 and have not been replaced.

Dr O’Neill warned that the needs of patients “cannot be met”.

She also said that services including the annual school assessments have fallen behind, adding that this puts children’s health at risk.

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FDA Issues Mercury Amalgam Filling Warning, Group Calls For Even More Protection

Yesterday, the FDA updated its recommendations concerning dental amalgam fillings and cautioned that “harmful health effects of mercury vapor released from the device” could impact high-risk populations. Susceptible groups advised to avoid getting mercury amalgam fillings include pregnant women and fetuses; women planning to become pregnant; nursing women and their newborns and infants; children; people with neurological disease such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease; people with impaired kidney function; and people with known heightened sensitivity (allergy) to mercury or other components of dental amalgam.

“This is certainly a step in the right direction,” Jack Kall, DMD, IAOMT Executive Chairperson of the Board stated. “But mercury shouldn’t be placed in anyone’s mouth. All dental patients need to be protected, and dentists and their staff also need to be protected from working with this toxic substance.”

Dr. Kall is among a number of IAOMT member dentists and researchers

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A step-by-step guide for dentists starting to use Pinterest for marketing

If you are ready to jump in feet first and set up your dental office with a Pinterest account, I am here to help. Here are six steps to get started on Pinterest.

Katie Hess, RDH

Katie Hess, RDH.

1. Create your account

Go to the Pinterest business page to register. I prefer to keep new business accounts separate from personal accounts.

2. Create your boards

I recommend starting with eight to 10 boards. Name the boards according to the topics you will be creating and the information you’ll be sharing. Some suggestions include the name of your practice, dental before-and-after photos, tips for dental hygienists, dental health tips, children’s dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, and orthodontics.

As you set up your boards, be sure to enter descriptions of the kinds of information you will be sharing to each board. This will help Pinterest direct searches to your content.

For creation ideas, take a look

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Arthur Dugoni, longtime dean of Pacific’s dentistry school, dies at 95

Scott Linesburgh
 
| The Record

During his long career, including 28 years as dean, Dr. Arthur A. Dugoni helped University of the Pacific’s school of dentistry become one of the best in the nation.

Dugoni died Wednesday at his home in Palo Alto. He was 95. He is remembered as an energetic educator and fundraiser, whose motto was “at Pacific we grow people, and along the way they become doctors.”

The San Francisco-based school was named the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in his honor in August 2004, while he was still dean. He became the first and only person in the United States or Canada to have a dental school named in their honor while holding the position of dean.

Photos: Pacific dedicates new San Francisco campus, the home of the Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry  

“Art Dugoni was one of the most important leaders in the

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Holly Springs orthodontist partners with Smiles Change Lives to help families get braces for kids during coronavirus pandemic

HOLLY SPRINGS, N.C. (WTVD) — As many families try to cut costs during the COVID-19 pandemic, an organization that provides braces at a tiny fraction of the full cost said it has been extremely busy.

Dr. Kristen Fritz of Fritz Orthodontics partners with Smiles Change Lives to help families afford the cost of orthodontic care.

“So many people lost their jobs during the pandemic and we don’t want that to delay treatment for their children,” Fritz said.

Even during good economic times, Fritz said many children’s families couldn’t afford braces. And for those with badly misaligned teeth, having them straightened was transformational.
“The difference in those patients from before to after is amazing because their confidence grows, their entire life can change, they’re proud of their smile,” Fritz said.

RELATED: Dental check-up safety debated amid COVID-19 pandemic

Smiles Change Lives said it has seen a marked increase in applications for

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